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WinterGreen Turf Dye

 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z #

Select the first letter of the word from the list above to jump to appropriate section of the glossary. If the term you are looking for starts with a digit or symbol, choose the '#' link.


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Aeration
 
There are many ways to Aerate a lawn. The most common is to poke small holes over the entire surface of the lawn. The object is to loosen the soil and to allow water, air and nutrients easier access to the roots of the lawn.
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Bermuda Grass
 
A mat-forming perennial grass (Cynodon dactylon), wide spread in warm regions and important as a lawn and pasturage grass in the southern United States.


The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Third Edition copyright © 1992 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Electronic version licensed from InfoSoft International, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Cool season grass
Typically this is a grass variety with the highest rate of growth occurring during the winter or cool months of the year. Fescues, Bluegrasses, Bentgrasses and Ryegrasses are referred to as cool season grasses. Conversely, during our warm summer months, these grasses are at their slowest rate of growth which reduces their resistance to disease, insect damage and poor management practices during this period. Cool season grasses are not native to the San Joaquin Valley, but they do retain their green color all year long in our climate.
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Dormancy
Warm season grasses stop growing during cold weather (When lows get below 40º). They will lose their green color during this time. The length and degree of dormancy varies between varieties.
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Endophyte
This is a beneficial fungus to lawn grass. It helps make the plant resistant to certain diseases. The draw back is that grasses containing a high endophyte level should not be used as a feed/forage grass for animals.
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Fungus
There are many types of fungus diseases that can damage turfgrass. The best remedy is to apply a broad spectrum fungicide as soon as the problem is identified, or even as part of your regular maintenance program. Always be sure to follow label and safety instructions. Fungus can be easily spread throughout an otherwise healthy lawn by a contaminated lawn mower or foot traffic. Proper watering and regular maintenance are the best preventions of fungus. Over-watering, high humidity, high temperatures, improper fertilizing, thatch mat build-up are some of the most common causes.
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Hybrid Bermuda
A hybrid bermuda is a variety of grass artificially cross bred to achieve certain beneficial characteristics such as drought tolerance, greener color, finer leaf texture, disease resistance, fast wear recovery. By virtue of being a "hybrid" (such as a mule), these grasses produce sterile seeds and can only be propagated by planting stolons/portions of the mother plant. See All About Stolons.
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Overseed
Sewing seed in a lawn that is already established and growing. There are two reasons to do this. First and most common is to put rye seed over a warm season grass for winter color. The second is to fill in a thinning lawn.

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Patented Variety
A patented variety is actually registerd with the U.S. Patent Office. Royalties must be paid to the holder of this patent whenever the grass is sold.
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Runners
These are the "above the ground" off shoots from the mother plant which contain leaf material and the plant node capable of reproduction. Many warm season grasses, especially bermuda types, send runners out across the top of the ground as well as underneath the ground (rhizomes). These runners can be bothersome in flower gardens unless controlled.
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Sod
A mat of living grass plants consisting of blades, roots and soil which has been severed from its growing bed in such a manner as to permit transplanting in its entirety. This living grass mat includes grass that is seasonable dormant but capable of renewing growth after the dormant period.
Stolon
A stolon is a portion of the grass plant that contains the genetic root node capable of reproduction. Hybrid bermudagrasses generally do not produce a viable seed, the only way to propagate them (other than sod plugs) is to plant the sections of the mother plant containing the root node or stolon. Please see All About Stolons
 
Seed Head
A small shoot or spike put off by grass plants that contains seeds. Some "hybrid" varieties (Tifgreen hybrid bermuda for example) produce sterile seed heads (no pollen). This quality makes Tifgreen hybrid bermuda grass lawns very appealing to person with grass pollen allergies.
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- T -

Top Dressing
Tifgreen hybrid bermuda lawns are occasionally benefited by a light top-dressing of fine sand. This is especially applicable if the surface is uneven or you want a putting green surface. Heavy, single applications of sand should be avoided; a normal application is 1 cubic yard per 1,000 sq. ft. This can be spread evenly with the back of a rake or dragged in with wire mesh such as a steel mesh door mat.
Topper
An organic material used to cover freshly sewn seed or stolons. It's purpose is to retain moisture and heat, encouraging germination. It is also helpful in discouraging birds from eating freshly sewn seed
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Vertical mowing
Also known as verticutting. If thatch is allowed to build up (this is why low mowing is important to Tifgreen hybrid bermuda), it should be removed by verticutting. A vertical mower cuts the thatch and brings it up to the lawn surface where it is raked away and removed. The cutter blades should be adjusted to just reach soil level, no lower. If thatch is very heavy, go across turf in both directions. This operation leaves the lawn brown and somewhat unsightly; recovery to a much healthier turf is prompt and should be assisted by an application of high nitrogen fertilizer. We recommend vertical mowing or renovating (complete removal of thatch cover) during warm weather to encourage quick recovery. Most rental yards carry the necessary equipment for this job.


 

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Warm Season Grass
These grasses grow primarily during the warm months of the year. They go dormant when weather turns cold and daylight hours are short, typically at the first frost. During this dormant state, the grass leaf loses its color and appears straw like. (However, in areas where the winters are very mild, some warm season grasses will continue grow and retain their leaf color.) In the springtime or when soil temperatures warm and the hours of daylight increase, these grasses come out of dormancy and begin to produce leafy green lawns.
 
Winter Color
Hybrid bermudas are warm season grasses and will go dormant in cool weather in most inland areas. While this dormancy is for a short period (usually November to March), it is objectionable to some lawn owners. The degree of dormancy is greatly determined by the condition of the grass in the late fall. Lawns that are mowed low and maintained at a high fertilizer level will retain better color. If green grass is desired during the winter, the lawn can be scalped, heavily verticut or renovated and a high quality, weed free ryegrass seed sown into the lawn. (See How to Overseed) If overseeding is not desired, green color can also be maintained by applying WinterGreen turf dye.
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Copyright © 2010 Old River SOD. All Rights Reserved. The marks Old River SOD, the Old River Sod Logo and Snail Logo are trademarks of Old River SOD in the United States and Foreign countries. Contact us at 1-800-US-GRASS or locally at 661-397-7611